Centuori & Associates, PC

Once a married couple makes the decision to file for divorce, it is not exactly commonplace to make a U-turn on that decision. It can happen, mind you -- but in most cases, the divorce sticks. The married couple has reached a breaking point in their relationship, one that demands a reset button. Maybe the couple is able to pass over that reset button, but it is uncommon to reach that decision.

What we're trying to say is that even though divorce is labeled as this "bad" process, once it is decided upon, it is best to let the splitting couple close this chapter of their lives and move on to pastures new.

So has brought us to this topic? Well, a number of states have proposed divorce "waiting period" laws, for lack of a better term), recently. Utah is considering a law that would amend its current rule, which says that a divorcing couple must complete a class first. The amendment would force the class to occur earlier than it does now, creating the possibility for a more drawn-out waiting period for the divorcing couple.

Oklahoma also has a proposal to make divorcing couples wait six months before their split is finalized, while North Carolina wants to push their waiting period to two years. While these proposals have nothing to do with Arizona, there are clear indicators out there that lawmakers are trying to force this divorce "limbo" on couples in an attempt to improve the divorce rate. The question is, do these laws really achieve that goal?

Source: Huffington Post, "Utah Lawmaker's Proposal Would Create Additional Hurdle For Divorcing Parents," Annie Knox, AP, Feb. 25, 2014

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information

Contact Our Arizona Law Firm Contact us vis the form below to arrange an initial consultation with an experienced Tucson attorney. Hablamos español.

Tap to Arrange an Initial
Consultation Now »

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy